The Art of Making Videos – Part 1 : The Basic Rules

Can you remember the last time you watched something on the internet? The chances are that you probably can, and that it was pretty recent. Thanks to websites like YouTube, it’s easier now more than ever to upload and watch videos online. I couple of weeks ago I went to a really interesting session on producing video content for online and mobile platforms, hosted by Openmute for the Art of Digital London programme.

By the end of the session, I realised just how important it was for arts organisations to make the most of the opportunities which video hosting can bring- whether to enhance a website experience, to market a certain performance or to just spread the word about something. I took down too many notes so I thought I would share some with you, and will host new topics on here through the next few days. Today, we will focus on the basic rules behind producing video content.

Before you begin embarking on a video project, ask yourselves:

– Who is the target audience, and where will they find your film?

– What are the objectives for the film? Is it to inform, is it to boost awareness of something, or to promote a production?

In trying to answer these questions, think about these tips:

– Length of your film- the general rule is not to exceed 5 minutes. If you think you have too much footage then produce two different versions – one can be 20 minutes long and one can be a condensed 3 minute version.

-Particularly for arts organisations, it is so important to convey the fact that downloading and watching a video is not the same as witnessing the experience in real life.

Explain your production rather than just showing the highlights. Film some audience feedback, or interviews with actors and directors. This grabs the viewer’s attention and arouses curiosity much more than having all the good bits served up on a plate! It’s important to mention here that there are always copyright issues when it comes to broadcasting artistic output (be it a performance, or even the music used as a background). Also be aware of the fact that even though a musician or actor may allow you consent to use their material in a video, this may at times still be unlawful, so always consult with the relevant unions prior to undertaking any sort of filming.

– And one last tip: avoid trying to intentionally create viral videos- these very rarely become star attractions, and your audience are savvy enough to realise if something has been staged.

A great example of an organisation demonstrating these guidelines are the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, who I have featured on this blog before. Check out their famous video below- I hope it inspires you!

That’s it for today. Next, we’ll be looking at all the different ways to distribute a film online.

Zurich Chamber Orchestra play on the power of Emotion

ZKO_HeartbeatI’ve only just discovered Zurich Chamber Orchestra’s powerful and innovative advertising campaigns. Last year, the Orchestra launched an online viral that likened music to a rollercoaster, becoming an online hit with over quarter of a million views on Youtube. This year, the Orchestra’s continued it’s theme of emotion by focusing on the human anatomy and it’s response to powerful music. If you feel inspired by Zurich’s campaign and want to make your own online video, check out our ‘Art of Making Videos’ series by clicking here.